Education Health

How to Help Your Mental Health During Online Education

health education online

Online Education Taking Its Toll

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, a lot of universities and schools opted for online courses. In addition to the health and safety considerations, online education is comfortable, cheaper, and more flexible. However, just like with any other benefit in life, the advantages of online education also come at a price.

The lack of social interaction is perhaps the key challenge that affects students, teachers, and parents negatively. Excessive periods spent in front of your monitor and back-to-back classes over Zoom might lead to unintended, often inevitable, mental health issues. You need to be savvy about the steps you take to mitigate or eliminate the related threats and risks.

What Are the Risks I Need to Be Aware of?

Research shows that COVID-19 exacerbated the mental health crisis at colleges significantly. According to a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report, every fourth person aged 18-24 has considered suicide in the last 30 days or so. While this is an extreme case, it is important to be wary of the long-term implications of protracted isolation for our health.

Those of you restricted to online classes due to the pandemic-related restrictions are likely to experience some form of mental health issues. Some of the specific problems include:

  • Fatigue
  • Poor sleep quality
  • Loss of focus
  • Increased stress and anxiety
  • Lack of motivation
  • Waning interest in social interactions

4 Steps to Help Your Mental Health

If you can relate to any of the above or similar risks, take action sooner rather than later to make sure things don’t get out of hand. Whether you are using an essay writers service or an academic course, you’re likely to face potential health risks. We hope our recommendations will help you mitigate or eliminate them to ensure you get the most out of your educational experience without any negative effects.

–      Organize space

Identify space at home where you will have maximum privacy to protect yourself from distractions and the stress of embarrassment caused by disruptions during your online courses or calls. Ensure proper lighting to avoid eye strain or headaches. Air the room on a regular basis.

–      Manage your workload

Manage your workload regularly and effectively by planning ahead. If you intend to use essay writing websites, go through the websites carefully, familiarize yourself with the specific terms, delivery times, and the types of services that meet your needs best. Avoid scheduling back-to-back online sessions or calls, and make sure you allow at least a five-minute break in between.

–      Healthy lifestyle

If you have been ignoring regular exercise, healthy foods, and a healthy lifestyle writ large, now is the time to change your mind. You do not necessarily need to go to the gym to lift weights; just try to pick a sports activity you enjoy most and stick to it on a regular basis. Make an effort to develop healthy lifestyle strategies, focusing on a healthy diet and getting 7-8 hours of sleep. Follow a daily hygiene routine just as you’d do if you were attending classroom-based classes.

–      Conscious face-to-face contact

Although you’ll be spending a lot of time in front of your laptop, make time for face-to-face meetings, taking into account the applicable health and safety rules. Humans are social beings and complete or near isolation is too taxing for anyone to cope with. Try this with your friends or classmates. Simple things like taking lunch breaks together will have a huge impact on your mental health.

Final Thoughts

While the overall benefits of online education might outweigh the related risks, it is judicious on your part to take measures to help your mental health during online education. No matter how rewarding your online classes are, take deliberate steps to take care of your mental health. The sooner, the better.

merismoore@gmail.com'

Merissa Moore

Merissa Moore is a long-time writer comparing and contrasting the pros and cons of online education across the world. She started exploring correlations between online education and mental health issues before COVID-19, focusing on distantly taught classes. Merissa’s blogs are popular with students, tutors, and parents.

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